Tuesday, 5 December 2017 14:34:41 Europe/London

The 5 types of Meadowmat wild flower turf available in Scotland

We’re getting lots of enquiries about Meadowmat wild flower turf so this blog offers a bit more information.

Don’t forget that you can contact us to request a copy of our brochure. It looks at types of Meadowmat, installation guidelines and the best way to manage a wildflower meadow.

There are 5 types of Meadowmat available for delivery in Scotland.  Each one is distinctively different yet all five are based on the same principal.

What is Meadowmat?

Meadowmat is exactly what its name suggests. It’s a pregrown mat of wildflowers and grasses that you can unroll for instant groundcover. The ground preparation and the handling are just like lawn turf but the plants in the mixture depends on what type of Meadowmat you have chosen.

A roll of meadowmat wild flower mat ready for installation

A roll of Meadowmat wildflower turf. This is traditional Meadowmat, the photo was taken in winter when some of the broadleaved plants are not as easy to see as they are in spring and summer.

Traditional Meadowmat

All of the plant species in this type of Meadowmat are native to the UK. And in fact, a large proportion of them are also listed as being native to Scotland.

This is the Meadowmat to choose for a sunny site where the soil is poor quality, well drained and low in nutrients.

It grows to around 1m high (that’s almost hip-height for me – I’m 5ft 4). There’s a lovely mix of grasses and flowers which really does look like an old fashioned hay meadow. It’s just lovely when planted on a bank or to replace a swathe of lawn.

Flowering time is usually May – July but by far the strongest, brightest blast of colour occurs in June when the oxeye daisies really steal the show.

traditional meadowmat

Traditional Meadowmat pictured in early summer. You can see how many flower buds are just about to burst into life.

Meadowmat for Birds and Bees

Of all five types of Meadowmat this one has the longest period of interest. Flowering starts early in the year with Bellis perennis, the common daisy.

Each one of the species in this Meadowmat offers some sort of value to wildlife. Some of the flowers are incredibly rich in pollen and nectar for bees to feast upon. Other plants are larval food plants for butterflies and moths. Several of the species have seed heads that will attract and feed small birds.

teasel seedhead

Meadowmat for Birds and Bees includes the iconic teasel in its seedmix. The flowers attract bumblebees, the seedheads attract small birds and the plants are tall enough to catch the eye from some distance away.

As spring moves into summer, the campions, clovers and harebells in Meadowmat for Birds and Bees come into their own and by the time midsummer arrives there is a cornucopia of colour. As summer fades into autumn, the seedheads form interesting shapes.

Usually slightly taller than Traditional Meadowmat, the teasels in Meadowmat for Birds and Bees can reach head height but most plants grow no higher than the tops of my legs.

Cottage Garden Meadowmat

This is the Meadowmat to buy if you are looking to fill beds and borders with colour. It has the smallest proportion of grass out of all the types of Meadowmat. It also includes some non-native plant species with jewel-coloured flowers.

Again, it’s very pollinator-friendly. It’s easy to grow and care for and will last for many years.

Meadowmat Roof and Garden

I hate to sound biased but this is my favourite Meadowmat. Its lower growing than the other mixes (roughly knee-high on me) and the grasses within the mix are quite fine-leaved and unobtrusive.  Of all the types of Meadowmat, this is the least like a meadow.

Some of the wildflowers in this mix – and they are all wildflowers – no non-natives – have the clearest, brightest colours you could imagine. Fox and cubs is a particular favourite of mine. Vipers bugloss is biannual flower but my goodness, don’t the bumblebees just love it! And as for maiden pink – well that colour just jumps out at you.

As the name suggests, this type of Meadowmat lends itself to green roofing as well as to ground cover. It really is stunning.

Woodland Shade Meadowmat

The fifth member of the wildflower turf family is Woodland Shade Meadowmat. This is the one to use if you’re not confident that the site gets enough sunlight to sustain wildflowers.

Ideal for planting under deciduous trees or in dappled shade, this Meadowmat tends to flower in early summer before the tree canopy gets too thick. For the middle-end parts of the summer it is more about subtle colours and lovely cool, wavy foliage.

This type of Meadowmat works well with mown paths, secret seating areas, statues, topiary and wildlife feeding stations.

meadow on a roof

Meadowmat is just as happy on top of a building as it is on the ground. Just be sure though that it has at least 15cm of growing medium to root into and that the building is strong enough to support the extra weight.

Easy maintenance

All types of Meadowmat are easy to maintain and, for parks, gardens and schools where budgets are tight, they can help reduce grounds maintenance bills.

For more information, contact Eleanor or Dave in the Stewarts Turf office. We can answer your questions and pop one of our brochures in the post for you to read.

More reading

Gardening with wildflowers in Scotland

How to lay Meadowmat wildflower turf

Posted in Wild Flowers
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